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at San Francisco International from an exhibition in Europe, and was pulled aside by CBP officers and ordered to unlock his i Phone for a search of its contents.

(The Fourth Amendment protects citizens against unlawful searches and seizures.) “…Any such search should be based on a warrant or, at a minimum, probable cause, and be limited in scope to that information relevant to the agency’s legitimate purpose in conducting the search. Gach’s phone illustrates, CBP’s policies do not in fact include the requirements necessary to guarantee the constitutionality of a device search.” The organization noted that the Supreme Court has already held that “a search of an electronic device constitutes a significant intrusion on an individual’s Fourth Amendment privacy interest, and held that searching an electronic device required a warrant even when the search was conducted incident to a lawful arrest.

Charnesia Corley, a 21-year-old African-American woman, had allegedly run through a stop sign when a Harris County patrol car pulled her over on June 21.

When a deputy officer claimed he smelled weed in Corley’s car, he handcuffed her and put her in the back of the patrol car while they searched her vehicle. However, upon returning to the patrol car, the deputy officer claimed he smelled the weed in Because the probe took place in a public parking lot and because Corley says that she did not give her consent, Corley’s lawyer says that the search was “unconstitutional” and she is filing a complaint with the Harris County Sheriff’s Office.

The truth is that even the most reputable online dating sites have scammers lurking in them.

In the “Get Verified” scam, your “date” directed you to a website that asked you to use a “free” verification service.

A Spring, Texas, woman has gone public with her story of having her vagina forcibly searched by cops when they claimed that they could smell weed in her car.

“Even at the border, the search of an electronic device is governed by the Fourth Amendment,” the ACLU wrote.

from a long trip and having a customs agent demand your mobile phone password so he or she can inspect its contents. The ACLU filed a formal complaint this week with CBP and Homeland Security officials, challenging the agencies’ right to examine phone data without a warrant.

In April NPR reported that in 2016, “the number of people asked to hand over their cell phones and passwords by Customs and Border Protection agents increased almost threefold over the year before.” The ACLU has taken up the case of a U. Gach asked that the CBP officers conduct their search of his phone in his presence, but they refused and searched it in a private area.

Customs & Border Protection is becoming more adamant about examining the cell phones of some arriving travelers – including U. citizens – and now the American Civil Liberties Union is challenging that practice. Gach resisted, but finally gave in when he was told that if he didn’t, CBP would keep his phone for an indefinite period.

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